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Last week, the Federal Circuit overturned the District Court judgment in Oracle v. Google, finding that the Java API is copyrightable. This move overturns the expectations of businesses and developers and is likely to negatively impact how they leverage APIs going forward. We have been thinking a lot about the ruling since it came down, putting together our thoughts.
ZeroVM is an exciting technology. It holds the promise of making cloud computing remarkably faster, lighter, more secure and more affordable.
After less than six months in development, Project Solum has accomplished the first development milestone (Milestone 1). This important event allows deployment of code from Github via Heat to generate a running app deployed to Docker containers using a generalized (Heroku) build pack for the app stack.
In the last few years we have seen new distributions emerge, like MariaDB and Percona Server, as viable alternatives to MySQL. These new distributions create more choice for users with increased focus on performance and offer new configurations that empower users to push the limits of their database and optimize in new ways.
Getting an application designed, tested and running, then updating and improving it is no easy task — even in the best of times. There is a continuing quest for tooling that delivers automation of this work to allow more focus on what matters most: fast, efficient development. This automation is increasingly sought via a platform service layer that abstracts the compute, networking and storage details of the infrastructure service layer — offering simplification for application developers and the cloud operators who support them.
Austin-based writer and artist Austin Kleon kicked off SXSW Interactive with his panel called “Show Your Work,” based on his latest book by the same title. Kleon argued that showcasing the creative process holds as much benefit for the creator as the end result. By showing your work, you are not operating in isolation, but becoming part of a scene. This community is where ideas are exchanged and valuable networks are made.
When we started OpenStack, the goal was to form a community of like-minded companies and contributors to push for an open alternative to proprietary cloud software. We saw open source as a platform to foster swift innovation and to give customers more choice.
It feels like yesterday that Frank Frankovsky, vice president of Hardware Design at Facebook and chairman of the Open Compute Project (OCP), sent me a Facebook message  – how fitting – about a budding open hardware project that he was working on. At Rackspace, we immediately jumped at the chance to be among the first companies to join the community, as we believed Open Compute was poised to flip the hardware model much like we did with cloud software when we founded OpenStack.
One of the things that we value at Rackspace is being “open,” which means that we prioritize sharing and collaborating over self-focused work. Being open creates value by aligning us with those whom we serve. It brings us all into closer and more productive partnership with each other, and enables us to deliver the Fanatical Support that is our trademark.
The mood in San Jose vacillated between quiet and congratulatory as participants in the fifth Open Compute Summit shared both their plans and their successes in front of a crowd of 3,800 registered attendees, up 90 percent from the 2,000 who registered last year.
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